Lahiri in Italian

Lahiri in Italian

By Vince Granata For the last three years, Jhumpa Lahiri has written in Italian. In fact, aside from translating Italian work—including her own—Italian has been the only language she has published in since 2015. For decades before the shift, she worked her way through lessons 

On New Words

On New Words

By Nick Chhoeun   Last week, I was the substitute teacher for a high school Arabic class. In this class, I hear a girl say, “Man, some people at this school are too sweet.” I asked her what she meant by that only to get 

On Translating Absence

On Translating Absence

By Jessica Harris I was once asked if I had ever experienced absence or a great heart presence. I struggled with recounting whether I had or not. What I do believe is that absence is an underlying thread in life. A familiar language for some 

Lost in Translation, Writing Memories

Lost in Translation, Writing Memories

By Vince Granata The question–a troubling one I’m still contending with–came out of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities. In the novel, Calvino imagines a dialogue between Marco Polo and Kublai Kahn, a back and forth in which Polo describes cities that Kahn believes span his empire. Eventually, Kahn 

Literary Event: Tracy K. Smith’s Inaugural Poet Laureate Reading

Literary Event: Tracy K. Smith’s Inaugural Poet Laureate Reading

By Yohanca Delgado On Wednesday, September 13th, Pulitzer-prize winner Tracy K. Smith read as Poet Laureate for the first time. Before she took the stage, nineteen-year-old Amanda Gorman read as the first ever Youth Poet Laureate. National youth organization Urban Word regional finals across the 

Ding Ding Ding!: Rejection Parties

Ding Ding Ding!: Rejection Parties

When I was fifteen, I was pretty sure I would be the next great horror writer. I wrote my first short story and boy-oh-boy did my teenage brain think that it was the best: An abused woman vomits up her heart, cooks it, feeds it 

Exit Memo: On Making it Happen

Exit Memo: On Making it Happen

On applying to graduate school in the first place: do it. On taking a workshop outside your genre, even though you’re still trying to find your footing in the genre you know and love: do it. On going to your professor’s office hours: do it. 

Exit Memo: On Failing

Exit Memo: On Failing

I’ve been a writer for four years. Four years is not a long time, especially when one considers that three of those years were spent in an MFA program for creative writing. Do you know what four-year-olds do, often? They fail. Hard. Have you ever 

A Cry Against War: Meeting Marione Ingram

A Cry Against War: Meeting Marione Ingram

“I lost it at Whole Foods today,” Marione Ingram confesses. She’s only been in the room for five minutes, and we are all already a little in love with her, so we lean in. “They were selling Passover cakes with train tracks drawn on them in 

It’s Not All Relative

It’s Not All Relative

Let’s talk about relative pronouns. The fate of humanity hangs in the balance. To review: our most common relative pronouns include who/whom, whoever/whomever, whose, that, and which. Aside: The that versus which distinction is not an issue that threatens our way of life. That said,